Pole Fitness is the Ultimate Core and Upper Body Workout for the Modern Woman

Archive for the ‘Tantric Movement’ Category

ACADEMY OF BURLESQUE W/ JENNIFER KENNEDY

Unleash your inner diva!!!

WELCOME TO JMKENNEDY ACADEMY SCHOOL OF BURLESQUE

I am thrilled to announce a brand new lass series, so Ladies come out to play because we have a great summer class curriculem for you to choose.  Click here to register online.

Our brand new class series is dedicated to the Art of Burlesque.

JMKennedyEntertainment  will transform any wannna-be burlesque diva into a great performer. Join the JMK Showgirl Chorus and

you will learn and have the chance to perform several fun and sexy burlesque chorus acts at the JMK Recital Show.  So get  your favorite lingerie

out of hiding in the top drawer and let’s get a jump on for summer… with Burlesquercise!

Learn the Art-Of :

Walking in Heels

Pastie Making

The Art of Tease

Taste of Tease

Bump & Grind

Burlesque Makeup

Tassel Twirling

Take it of for you Lover

Burlesque with Props

Fan Dancing

How to Make your Fans

Glove Peeling

How to Take off your Stockings

Work your Feather Boa

Costuming

AND MUCH MOORE!!!

Space is limited, and this is the only JMKBurlesque Showgirl Chorus series I will be offering until August, so come and get it while the gettin’s good!

No nudity is required.  This is all about comfort level. So, come on girls lets educate our audience. And give em the Wow! factor.

Wednesday 6:30pm – 7:30pm

Click Here to register for this class.

JMK is Now offering Hooping Classes!!! Starting Tuesday March, 8th!!!!

Register Now for Hooping w/ Lindsey

Hooping is coming to JMK Entertainment!  Classes begin next Tuesday!!!  This class is open to hoopers of all levels, from novice to advanced.  Never hooped before?  No problem!  You’ll be spinning in no time!  Hoops will be provided for new students at the first class, where you can custom order for a hoop made just for you!  If you have a hoop already, you’re welcome to bring it.  Wear comfortable, form fitting clothing made of natural fibers; tank tops are recommended; long hair should be tied back; sneakers or dance shoes required.  Bring water.

To Register  for classes click the link below:

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Vote for Providence’s Best HEALTH CLUB

Help us win!!! Vote for Providence’s Best HEALTH CLUB. Vote: JM Kennedy Dance & Pole Fitness Studio

Register for 2 JMK Classes and get the 3rd 50% off!!!

JMK Class Specials

A core and upper body workout for the modern women!

Studies have shown that best way to work out the entire body is by including Cardio, Strength Training, and Flexibility (Stretching) in your weekly workout.

1. Cardio – Take Zumba up to three times a week for your much needed cadio workout. Zumba is 45 minutes of none stop dancing. Its a fun way to burn those extra calories. Ditch the workout and Join the party!
2. Strength Training – Take pole fitness for the Strength Training. The pole offers a unique core and upper body workout that allows you to use your body weight as your resistance. Instead of lifting weights or using machines at a gym you are using your body to help you build muscle.
3. Flexibility & Stretching – Yoga is a great way to both stretch your body and build endurance while promoting relaxation and stress-relief. Yoga is a great addition to the traditional cardio and strength training weekly workout.
**SPECIAL PRICING***
Register for 2 JMK Classes and get the 3rd 50% off!!!

To learn more about our classes or to Register Online visit our website
http://www.jmkennedyentertainment.com/Site/Home.html 

Hope to see you soon!!!! 

Register Now for our Next 6 week Session

What is Pole Dancing?

Pole dancing is a form of performing art, a combination of dancing and gymnastics. A similar pole (Chinese poles) is used in cabaret/circus and stage performance in a non-erotic environment, in which context the style and moves are very different. Advanced pole dancing requires significant strength, flexibility and endurance. Upper body and core strength are important to proficiency, which takes time to develop.[1]

The Hinge

The ultimate core and upper-body workout for the modern woman

Pole dancing is now regarded as a recognized form of exercise[2] and can be used as both an aerobic and anaerobic workout.[3]

It is probable pole dancing started in America in the 1920s depression, with dancers in traveling shows using a tent pole as a prop.[citation needed] The relationship to Chinese poles is unclear, Chinese troupes performed in Barnum and Bailey’s Circus from 1914 but they did not perform on poles.[5]

Pole dancing gradually began evolving from tents to bars as burlesque became more acceptable in the 1950s.[citation needed] In the 1980s pole dancing and striptease became popular in Canada and then in the USA.[citation needed]

The pole

Standard pole

JMK Basic Pole Instructor's, Kristin & Kerri, playing on the poles

The standard dance pole typically consists of a hollow steel or brass pole with circular cross section, running from floor to ceiling. Affixing at the ceiling gives more stability, but is not always realized, especially at night clubs with higher ceilings or at transportable devices. In the United States, the diameter is usually around 5 cm (2 inches), allowing it to be gripped comfortably with one hand. In Asia, the diameter is usually slightly smaller at 45 mm or less.

Another common pole is the spinning pole; as its name suggests, it is similar to a standard dance pole but spins using ball bearings. The purpose of this pole is to create better momentum and higher rates of speed, in order to have a greater dramatic effect.

Home versions are available which may be used for practice or aerobic exercise. Materials of which poles are made include polished stainless steelchromed steel, brasspowder coating, and Titanium coating. Poles can also be made of acrylic glass which allows use of “glow poles” with LED lighting effects. Each material surface has different gripping properties. Polished steel is one of the slickest materials, which provides for a faster, more fluid dance; brass poles provide more friction, allowing for an easier hold with hands or thighs and creating a slow, sensual dance style.

Poles can be held in place by using threading to brace them against a ceiling joist. There are also poles that do not require construction and can be set up using tension. Stationary, rotating, and switchable versions are available.

BUY YOUR POLE HERE:

http://www.lilmynx.com/idevaffiliate/idevaffiliate.php?id=197

Show pole

There are now poles available for use in clubs that provide visual effects. These poles are made with clear plastics and contain water, glitter, and special reflective materials which stand out when used in conjunction with strobe lighting, as well as lighting hidden in their base joists. However, these poles are not favorable to a dancer wanting to achieve better pole tricks, as they bend slightly and have a tendency to create a friction burn when you slide down them with any sort of speed.

The ultimate core and upper body workout for the everyday woman

Pole dance as exercise

Pole dancing has gained popularity as a form of exercise, with increased awareness of the benefits to general strength and fitness.[6]This form of exercise increases core and general body strength by using the body itself as resistance, while toning the body as a whole.

Pole dancing as an exercise is very similar to Mallakhamb, an Indian men’s sport with no erotic component, but there is no evidence of a link.

A growing number of men are incorporating pole dancing into their fitness programmes.[7][8] In Australia, the UK and the US, dance studios are beginning to offer classes just for men. And in China, 2007’s National Pole Dancing competition was won by a man. Dance instructor Zhang Peng, 23, beat a host of women dancers to the top prize.[9]

Pole dance competitions

There is a growing community who are trying to get pole dancing taken seriously as a sport and art form. There are local pageants held in venues such as Australia, France, Canada, Japan, the Netherlands and the UK. More recently, amateur pole dance competitions have been held. These are strictly non-nude and non-stripping, and focus on pole dance as an athletic and artistic form of dance and exercise. The first “Miss Pole Dance World” competition [1] was held in november 2005, and Reiko [2] Suemune from Japan won the championship.

A group of advocates are even pushing for pole dancing to be represented as a test event in the 2012 London Olympics.[10][11] But because this is a relatively new trend, scoring for competitions is not standardised, while names of the techniques vary among different clubs in different regions.[12]

In Australia, “Miss Pole Dance Australia” was started in 2006. Danielle Asher took home the first prize in the latest 2010 competition, and Kelly Choi was first runner up.[13]The first US Pole Dance Federation (USPDF) Championship was held on March 19, 2009, first place was taken by Jenyne Butterfly.[14] The 2010 winner of “Miss Pole Dance Canada” was Crystal Lai, who went on to win the People’s Choice Award at the worlds. [15]Miss Pole Dance World 2009, which was held in Jamaica and opened to all nationalities, was won by Australian Felix Cane.[16] The 2010 event will take place in Zurich, Switzerland.[17] Miss Pole Dance World 2010 which was held in Switzerland and opened to all nationalities, was won by Australian Felix Cane.

Pole dance in the media

Like other trends, pole dancing has its share of celebrity following. Actress Sheila Kelley was so taken with the sport, which she learned while preparing for her role inDancing at the Blue Iguana, that she launched her own pole-based exercise programme.[18]

Rima Fakih‘s victory at Miss USA 2010, including the fact that she had won a pole-dancing competition three years earlier, attracted media attention.

Article Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pole_dance

Don’t forget to Register for Our next 6 week session of pole

@ JM Kennedy Dance & Pole Fitness Studio

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Register Now For Basic Chair with Alaina

“I want women to be liberated and still be able to have a nice ass and shake it.” ~Shirley MacLaine

 

Alluring, Magnetic, Seductive, Confident

Register Now for Basic Chair Starting Thursday’s @ 6:30  https://clients.mindbodyonline.com/ASP/home.asp?studioid=10118

Chair Dancing with Alaina @ JMKennedy Entertainment is a sure way to take your self confidence to another level!  Alaina uses Flirty Chair Dance moves and Basic Jazz Dance Choreography to get your mind & body feeling sexy & empowered.  You’ll burn calories, learn Alaina’s 10 Basic Chair Dance moves and gain control of your inner “Diva”.  Whether you are looking for some ideas to take home or just someplace to have fun with your girlfriends, this class will satisfy your wants & needs.

“Sex appeal is fifty percent what you’ve got and fifty percent what people think you’ve got.”~Sophia Loren

Register Now for Belly Dance – Check the Schedule for Upcoming Class Dates and Times

Belly dancing with a sword makes you feel powerful.

Click the link below to register for our Next 6 week Session of Belly Dance:

http://clients.mindbodyonline.com/ws.asp?studioid=10118&stype=-101&sTG=23&sVT=11&sView=week

According to Wikipedia:

Origins and early history of Belly Dance

 

Artistic depiction of belly dancing

Belly dancing arose from various dancing styles which were performed in the Middle East and North Africa. One theory is that belly dance may have roots in the ancient Arab tribal religions as a dance to the goddess of fertility . A third theory is that belly dance was always danced as entertainment, some believe that the movements of dancing girls depicted in carvings from Pharaonic times are typical of belly dancing.[1] As the term belly dance has come to refer to a wide variety of dance practices, predominantly performed by independent female dancers, it is very difficult for any single claim to be upheld.

Another theory is that belly dance was originally danced by women for women in the Levant, and North Africa. The book “Dancer of Shamahka” is widely cited; it is a romanticizedmemoir written by a modern author, Armen Ohanian, published in 1918. In Middle Eastern society two specific belly dance movements have been used in childbirth for generations.[2]

Because belly dance derives from individual performance, it has a diverse history of origin, and continues to evolve to this day. Some[who?] suggest that belly dance shares origins from migrating peoples from all around the borders of the Mediterranean, resulting in the similarities that can be seen between ‘belly dance’ as found in North Africa and Middle East.

Belly dance was popularized in the West during the Romantic movement of the 18th and 19th centuries, when Orientalist artists depicted romanticized images of harem life in theOttoman Empire. Around this time, dancers from Middle Eastern countries began to perform at various World’s Fairs, often drawing crowds in numbers that rivaled those for the science and technology exhibits. It was during this period that the term “oriental” or “eastern” dancing is first used. Several dancers, including the French author Colette, engaged in “oriental” dancing, sometimes passing off their own interpretations as authentic. Also the pseudo-Javanese dancer Mata Hari, convicted in 1917 by the French for being a German spy, danced in a style similar to what is known as belly dance.

Egyptian forms of belly dance, alongside the development of Egyptian music, were heavily influenced by the presence of European colonial forces, and increasing urbanisation in Egypt. This resulted in variations in the dance brought in by influences as diverse as marching bands, and visits of the Russian ballet. Many of the aspects recognisable as belly dance today in fact derive from these cross-cultural hybrids.

Any or all of these factors may have contributed to the development of belly dance as we know it today.[3]

Costume

In the West, the costume most associated with belly dance is the bedlah (Arabic for “suit”). It owes its creation to the Victorian painters of “Orientalism” and the harem fantasy productions of vaudevilleburlesque, andHollywood during the turn of the last century, rather than to authentic Middle Eastern dress.

The bedlah style includes a fitted top or bra (usually with a fringe of beads or coins), a fitted hip belt (again with a fringe of beads or coins), and a skirt or harem pants. The bra and belt may be richly decorated with beads, sequins, braid and embroidery. The belt may be a separate piece, or sewn into a skirt.

Badia Masabni, a Cairo cabaret owner, is credited with bringing the costume to Egypt, because it was the image that Western tourists wanted.

The hip belt is a broad piece of fabric worn low on the hips. It may have straight edge, or may be curved or angled. The bra usually matches the belt and does not resemble lingerie. The classic harem pants are full and gathered at the ankle, but there are many variations. Sometimes pants and a sheer skirt are worn together. Skirts may be flowing creations made of multiple layers of one color sheer fabric chiffon.

Costume in America

Oriental-style American dancers often purchase their costumes from Egypt or Turkey, but hallmarks of the classical “American” style include a headband with fringe, sheer harem pants or skirt rather than tight lycra, and the use of coins and metalwork to decorate the bra.

For the folkloric and baladi dances, a full-length beledi dress or galabeyah is worn, with or without cutouts.

American Tribal style dancers often make their own costumes or arrange to have them custom-made, as personality and originality are an important part of the costuming. This style of costume tends to involve large pants covered with one or more skirts and belts. The top is usually a coin bra with pieces hanging from it, and dancers wear flowers, headbands, metal headdresses, and other folkoric-inspired pieces in their hair. They also often wear bindis and sport large tattoos that travel around the hip and belly area.

Belly dance props

Props are used, especially in American restaurant style, to spark audience interest and add variety to the performance, although some traditionalists frown on their use. Some props in common usage are:

  • Finger cymbals (zills or sagats)
  • Cane (in the Saiidi)
  • Veil
  • Sword
  • Candelabra headdress (shamadan)
  • Veil poi (mostly in Tribal belly dance)
  • Fire sticks (mostly in Tribal)
  • Tambourine
  • Fan (mostly in Tribal)
  • Snakes (usually either pythons or boa constrictors)
  • Fanveils

Steps and technique

Most of the movements in belly dancing involve isolating different parts of the body (hips, shoulders, chest, stomach etc.), which appear similar to the isolations used in jazz ballet, but are often driven differently. In much of bellydance there is a focus upon the core muscles of the body producing the movement rather than the external muscles of the body. Egyptian and Lebanese bellydance in particular emphasise the need for movemements to originate in the muscles of the back. Correct posture is as important in bellydance as it is in other fields of dance. In most belly dance styles, the focus is on the hip and pelvic area. Due to the diversity of styles and ‘origins’ of the dance, many of the moves are referred to by a wide variety of different terminologies. However, from an observer’s point of view bellydance includes certain key elements.

Important moves are:

  • Shiver or Shimmy – a shimmering vibration of the hips. This vibration is usually layered onto other movements to create depth in performance. It may be created by moving the knees past each other at high speed, although some dancers use contractions of the glutes or thighs instead. It is also possible to perform this using the muscles of the lower back. The two terms may refer to performing this move in different directions, as it is possible to create this vibration moving the hips alternately up and down, side-to-side, or in a forward and back swinging motion. The same move can be performed using the shoulders and is sometimes called a shoulder shimmy.
  • Hip hits – A staccato movement of the hips out from the body. This can also be performed using other body parts such as the shoulders or chest. The move is usually performed by a quick shifting of the weight from one leg to the other and creates the impression of a swinging pelvis.
  • Undulations – Fluid movements of the hips or of the chest in a circular or rotating fashion. There are a wide variety of movements of this kind, of which the most well known is probably the rotating movements of the chest forward, up, back and down to create the impression of riding a camel.

Different styles also incorporate kicks and arm movements as an integral part of the style.

Health and belly dancing

Belly dance is a non-impact, weight-bearing exercise and is thus suitable for all ages, and is a good exercise for the prevention of osteoporosis in older people. Many of the moves involve isolations, which improves flexibility of the torso. Dancing with the veil can help build strength in the upper-body, arm and shoulders. Playing the zills trains fingers to work independently and builds strength. The legs and long muscles of the back are strengthened by hip movements.[14]

Paffrath also researched the effect of belly dance on women with menstruation problems. The subjects reported a more positive approach toward their menstruation, sexuality, and bodies.

Article Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belly_dance

Burlesque vs. Cabaret – What is the difference?

“What I love about Cabaret and Burlesque is both shows allow the performers to be on same level as the audience. When I’m dancing for you its like 3d, right in your face.”

-Jennifer Kennedy

What is the difference between a Burlesque show and a Cabaret Show???

According to Wikipedia Cabaret is:

Cabaret is a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theatre, distinguished mainly by the performance venue—a restaurant or nightclub with a stage for performances and the audience sitting at tables (often dining or drinking) watching the performance being introduced by a master of ceremonies or emcee (MC).

Cabaret also refers to a Mediterranean-style brothel—a bar with tables and women who mingle with and entertain the clientele. Traditionally these establishments can also feature some form of stage entertainment, often singers and dancers.

In the United States, cabaret diverged into several different styles of performance mostly due to the influence of Jazz Music. Chicago cabaret focused intensely on the larger band ensembles and reached its peak in the speakeasies, and steakhouses (like The Palm) of the Prohibition Era.

New York cabaret never developed to feature a great deal of social commentary. When New York cabarets featured jazz, they tended to focus on famous vocalists likeNina SimoneBette MidlerEartha KittPeggy Lee, and Hildegarde rather than instrumental musicians. Cabaret in the United States began to decline in the 1960s, due to the rising popularity of rock concert shows and television variety shows.[citation needed] The art form still survives in various musical formats as well as in the Stand-up comedy format and in popular drag show performances.

Cabaret is currently undergoing a renaissance of sorts in the United States, particularly in New OrleansSeattlePhiladelphia and Portland, Oregon, as new generations of performers reinterpret the old forms in both music and theatre. Many contemporary cabaret groups in the United States and elsewhere feature a combination of original music, burlesque and political satire, as can be found in such groups as Cabaret Red Light and Leviathan: Political Cabaret. In New York City, since 1985, successful, enduring or innovative cabaret acts have been honored by the annual Bistro Awards.[1]

Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabaret

New Burlesque According to Wikipedia:

Burlesque is a humorous theatrical entertainment involving parody and sometimes extreme exaggeration.

New Burlesque

A new generation nostalgic for the spectacle and perceived glamour of the old times determined to bring burlesque back. This revival was pioneered independently in the early 1990s by Billie Madley’s “Cinema” and later with Ami Goodheart in “Dutch Weismann’s Follies” revues in New York, Michelle Carr’s “The Velvet Hammer” troupe in Los Angeles, and The Shim-Shamettes in New Orleans. In addition, and throughout the country, many individual performers were incorporating aspects of burlesque in their acts. These productions, inspired by the likes of Sally RandTempest StormGypsy Rose Lee and Lili St. Cyr, have themselves gone on to inspire a new generation of performers such as Dita Von Teese. In the case of such performers as Julie Atlas Muz and Agitprop groups like Cabaret Red Light, the revival of burlesque has also provided a new vehicle for political satire and performance art. The revival of roller derby also features elements of burlesque.[11]

Today New Burlesque has taken many forms, but all have the common trait of honoring one or more of burlesque’s previous incarnations, with acts including striptease, expensive costumes, bawdy humor, cabaret and more. There are modern burlesque performers and shows all over the world, and annual conventions such as the Vancouver International Burlesque Festival and the Miss Exotic World Pageant are held. In 2008, The New York Times noted that burlesque had made a comeback in the city’s art performance scene.

Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burlesque


What is Burlesque?

AMERICAN BURLESQUE

ACCORDING TO WIKIPEDIA

Development of American burlesque

According to Wikipedia This is the definition of American Burlesque. What do you think?

While the American form of burlesque has its origins in 19th century music hall entertainments and vaudeville, in the early 20th century American burlesque re-emerged as a populist blend of satire, performance art, and adult entertainment featuring striptease and broad comedy acts that derived their name from the low comedy aspects of the literary genre known asburlesque. Here the term “burlesque” was used loosely to describe these adult revue shows in which striptease acts would perform—often with themes, characters or gimmicks—but classic striptease and “hootchy kootchy” dance were already forms in themselves and not automatically “burlesque” by default.

In burlesque, performers, usually female, often create elaborate sets with lush, colorful costumes, mood-appropriate music, and dramatic lighting, and may even include novelty acts, such as fire breathing or contortionists, to enhance the impact of their performance.

Put simply, burlesque means “in an upside down style”. Like its cousin, commedia dell’arte, burlesque turns social norms head over heels. Burlesque is a style of live entertainment that encompasses pastiche, parody, and wit. The genre traditionally encompasses a variety of acts such as dancing girls, chanson singers, comedians, mime artists, and striptease artistes, all satirical and with a saucy edge. The striptease element of burlesque became subject to extensive local legislation, leading to a theatrical form that titillated without falling foul of censors.

The American form also was highly influenced by 19th century English variety and music hall shows as developed in the 1840s, early in the Victorian era, a time of culture clashes between the social rules of established aristocracy and a working class society. Originally, burlesque featured shows that included comic sketches, oftenlampooning the social attitudes of the upper classes and their music (particularly parodies of opera songs), alternating with dance routines. It developed alongside vaudeville and ran on competing circuits. In Britain, burlesque continued its established position in theatreland and enjoyed its own theatres (such as the Olympic Theatre in London) and was largely a middle class pursuit, where the jokes relied on the audiences’ familiarity with known operas and artistic works.

In its heyday, American burlesque bore little resemblance to the earlier literary and musical burlesques of the UK (now known as “classical” or “traditional British” burlesque) which parodied widely known works of literature, theater, or music and did not feature striptease. Possibly due to historical social tensions between the upper classes and lower classes of society, much of the humor and entertainment of later American burlesque focused on lowbrow and ribald subjects.

The popular burlesque show of the 1870s through the 1920s referred to a raucous, somewhat bawdy style of variety theater inspired by Lydia Thompson and her troupe, the British Blondes, who first appeared in the United States in the 1860s, and also by early “leg” shows such as The Black Crook (1866). Its form, humor, and aesthetic traditions were largely derived from the minstrel show. One of the first burlesque troupes was the Rentz-Santley Novelty and Burlesque Company, created in 1870 byMichael B. Leavitt, who had earlier feminized the minstrel show with his group Madame Rentz’s Female Minstrels.

Burlesque rapidly adapted the minstrel show’s tripartite structure: part one was composed of songs and dances rendered by a female company, interspersed with low comedy from male comedians. Part two was an “olio” of short specialties in which the women did not appear. The show’s finish was a grand finale.

The genre often mocked established entertainment forms such as opera, Shakespearean drama, musicals, and ballet. The costuming (or lack thereof) increasingly focused on forms of dress considered inappropriate for polite society. The British form, however, carried on much in the same musical-satirical style of the 19th century and is still so today.

Gypsy Rose Lee became famous for her shows in America

By the 1880s, the genre had created some rules for defining itself:

  • Minimal costuming, often focusing on the female form.
  • Sexually suggestive dialogue, dance, plotlines and staging.
  • Quick-witted humor laced with puns, but lacking complexity.
  • Short routines or sketches with minimal plot cohesion across a show.

Charlie Chaplin in his autobiography gives this account of burlesque in Chicago in 1910:

Chicago … had a fierce pioneer gaiety that enlivened the senses, yet underlying it throbbed masculine loneliness. Counteracting this somatic ailment was a national distraction known as the burlesque show, consisting of a coterie of rough-and-tumble comedians supported by twenty or more chorus girls. Some were pretty, others shopworn. Some of the comedians were funny, most of the shows were smutty harem comedies—coarse and cynical affairs.
—Charles Chaplin, My Autobiography: 125–6

The popular burlesque show of this period eventually evolved into the striptease which became the dominant ingredient of burlesque by the 1930s. In the 1930s, a social crackdown on burlesque shows led to their gradual downfall. The shows had slowly changed from ensemble ribald variety performances, to simple performances focusing mostly on the striptease. The end of burlesque and the birth of striptease was later dramatized in the film The Night They Raided Minsky’s.

ARTICLE SOURCE:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burlesque

 

If you are interested in learning more about this unique art form register for our Burlesque work shop and pin up shoot December 11th & 12th.

Let your inner diva come out to play…

Burlesque Workshop – Saturday December 11TH

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Burlesque Photo Shoot – Sunday December 12th

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Walking On The Ceiling – Level II Pole

Wednesday December 1st. Jennifer Kennedy decided to walk on the Ceiling 20 ft. in the air. Check out the video. Don’t forget to Register for Pole Level II starting Wednesday January 12th @ 7:30!!!

Click Here to Register:

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Specials (Can’t pay for Specials online. Must pay the Day of Class to receive Discounts):

Option 1:

Register for 2 JMK Classes and get 50% off the 3rd!!!

Option 2:

Register for Pole and Zumba Classes for only $180.00!!!

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