Pole Fitness is the Ultimate Core and Upper Body Workout for the Modern Woman

Posts tagged ‘circus’

What is Pole Dancing?

Pole dancing is a form of performing art, a combination of dancing and gymnastics. A similar pole (Chinese poles) is used in cabaret/circus and stage performance in a non-erotic environment, in which context the style and moves are very different. Advanced pole dancing requires significant strength, flexibility and endurance. Upper body and core strength are important to proficiency, which takes time to develop.[1]

The Hinge

The ultimate core and upper-body workout for the modern woman

Pole dancing is now regarded as a recognized form of exercise[2] and can be used as both an aerobic and anaerobic workout.[3]

It is probable pole dancing started in America in the 1920s depression, with dancers in traveling shows using a tent pole as a prop.[citation needed] The relationship to Chinese poles is unclear, Chinese troupes performed in Barnum and Bailey’s Circus from 1914 but they did not perform on poles.[5]

Pole dancing gradually began evolving from tents to bars as burlesque became more acceptable in the 1950s.[citation needed] In the 1980s pole dancing and striptease became popular in Canada and then in the USA.[citation needed]

The pole

Standard pole

JMK Basic Pole Instructor's, Kristin & Kerri, playing on the poles

The standard dance pole typically consists of a hollow steel or brass pole with circular cross section, running from floor to ceiling. Affixing at the ceiling gives more stability, but is not always realized, especially at night clubs with higher ceilings or at transportable devices. In the United States, the diameter is usually around 5 cm (2 inches), allowing it to be gripped comfortably with one hand. In Asia, the diameter is usually slightly smaller at 45 mm or less.

Another common pole is the spinning pole; as its name suggests, it is similar to a standard dance pole but spins using ball bearings. The purpose of this pole is to create better momentum and higher rates of speed, in order to have a greater dramatic effect.

Home versions are available which may be used for practice or aerobic exercise. Materials of which poles are made include polished stainless steelchromed steel, brasspowder coating, and Titanium coating. Poles can also be made of acrylic glass which allows use of “glow poles” with LED lighting effects. Each material surface has different gripping properties. Polished steel is one of the slickest materials, which provides for a faster, more fluid dance; brass poles provide more friction, allowing for an easier hold with hands or thighs and creating a slow, sensual dance style.

Poles can be held in place by using threading to brace them against a ceiling joist. There are also poles that do not require construction and can be set up using tension. Stationary, rotating, and switchable versions are available.



Show pole

There are now poles available for use in clubs that provide visual effects. These poles are made with clear plastics and contain water, glitter, and special reflective materials which stand out when used in conjunction with strobe lighting, as well as lighting hidden in their base joists. However, these poles are not favorable to a dancer wanting to achieve better pole tricks, as they bend slightly and have a tendency to create a friction burn when you slide down them with any sort of speed.

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Pole dance as exercise

Pole dancing has gained popularity as a form of exercise, with increased awareness of the benefits to general strength and fitness.[6]This form of exercise increases core and general body strength by using the body itself as resistance, while toning the body as a whole.

Pole dancing as an exercise is very similar to Mallakhamb, an Indian men’s sport with no erotic component, but there is no evidence of a link.

A growing number of men are incorporating pole dancing into their fitness programmes.[7][8] In Australia, the UK and the US, dance studios are beginning to offer classes just for men. And in China, 2007’s National Pole Dancing competition was won by a man. Dance instructor Zhang Peng, 23, beat a host of women dancers to the top prize.[9]

Pole dance competitions

There is a growing community who are trying to get pole dancing taken seriously as a sport and art form. There are local pageants held in venues such as Australia, France, Canada, Japan, the Netherlands and the UK. More recently, amateur pole dance competitions have been held. These are strictly non-nude and non-stripping, and focus on pole dance as an athletic and artistic form of dance and exercise. The first “Miss Pole Dance World” competition [1] was held in november 2005, and Reiko [2] Suemune from Japan won the championship.

A group of advocates are even pushing for pole dancing to be represented as a test event in the 2012 London Olympics.[10][11] But because this is a relatively new trend, scoring for competitions is not standardised, while names of the techniques vary among different clubs in different regions.[12]

In Australia, “Miss Pole Dance Australia” was started in 2006. Danielle Asher took home the first prize in the latest 2010 competition, and Kelly Choi was first runner up.[13]The first US Pole Dance Federation (USPDF) Championship was held on March 19, 2009, first place was taken by Jenyne Butterfly.[14] The 2010 winner of “Miss Pole Dance Canada” was Crystal Lai, who went on to win the People’s Choice Award at the worlds. [15]Miss Pole Dance World 2009, which was held in Jamaica and opened to all nationalities, was won by Australian Felix Cane.[16] The 2010 event will take place in Zurich, Switzerland.[17] Miss Pole Dance World 2010 which was held in Switzerland and opened to all nationalities, was won by Australian Felix Cane.

Pole dance in the media

Like other trends, pole dancing has its share of celebrity following. Actress Sheila Kelley was so taken with the sport, which she learned while preparing for her role inDancing at the Blue Iguana, that she launched her own pole-based exercise programme.[18]

Rima Fakih‘s victory at Miss USA 2010, including the fact that she had won a pole-dancing competition three years earlier, attracted media attention.

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Burlesque vs. Cabaret – What is the difference?

“What I love about Cabaret and Burlesque is both shows allow the performers to be on same level as the audience. When I’m dancing for you its like 3d, right in your face.”

-Jennifer Kennedy

What is the difference between a Burlesque show and a Cabaret Show???

According to Wikipedia Cabaret is:

Cabaret is a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theatre, distinguished mainly by the performance venue—a restaurant or nightclub with a stage for performances and the audience sitting at tables (often dining or drinking) watching the performance being introduced by a master of ceremonies or emcee (MC).

Cabaret also refers to a Mediterranean-style brothel—a bar with tables and women who mingle with and entertain the clientele. Traditionally these establishments can also feature some form of stage entertainment, often singers and dancers.

In the United States, cabaret diverged into several different styles of performance mostly due to the influence of Jazz Music. Chicago cabaret focused intensely on the larger band ensembles and reached its peak in the speakeasies, and steakhouses (like The Palm) of the Prohibition Era.

New York cabaret never developed to feature a great deal of social commentary. When New York cabarets featured jazz, they tended to focus on famous vocalists likeNina SimoneBette MidlerEartha KittPeggy Lee, and Hildegarde rather than instrumental musicians. Cabaret in the United States began to decline in the 1960s, due to the rising popularity of rock concert shows and television variety shows.[citation needed] The art form still survives in various musical formats as well as in the Stand-up comedy format and in popular drag show performances.

Cabaret is currently undergoing a renaissance of sorts in the United States, particularly in New OrleansSeattlePhiladelphia and Portland, Oregon, as new generations of performers reinterpret the old forms in both music and theatre. Many contemporary cabaret groups in the United States and elsewhere feature a combination of original music, burlesque and political satire, as can be found in such groups as Cabaret Red Light and Leviathan: Political Cabaret. In New York City, since 1985, successful, enduring or innovative cabaret acts have been honored by the annual Bistro Awards.[1]



New Burlesque According to Wikipedia:

Burlesque is a humorous theatrical entertainment involving parody and sometimes extreme exaggeration.

New Burlesque

A new generation nostalgic for the spectacle and perceived glamour of the old times determined to bring burlesque back. This revival was pioneered independently in the early 1990s by Billie Madley’s “Cinema” and later with Ami Goodheart in “Dutch Weismann’s Follies” revues in New York, Michelle Carr’s “The Velvet Hammer” troupe in Los Angeles, and The Shim-Shamettes in New Orleans. In addition, and throughout the country, many individual performers were incorporating aspects of burlesque in their acts. These productions, inspired by the likes of Sally RandTempest StormGypsy Rose Lee and Lili St. Cyr, have themselves gone on to inspire a new generation of performers such as Dita Von Teese. In the case of such performers as Julie Atlas Muz and Agitprop groups like Cabaret Red Light, the revival of burlesque has also provided a new vehicle for political satire and performance art. The revival of roller derby also features elements of burlesque.[11]

Today New Burlesque has taken many forms, but all have the common trait of honoring one or more of burlesque’s previous incarnations, with acts including striptease, expensive costumes, bawdy humor, cabaret and more. There are modern burlesque performers and shows all over the world, and annual conventions such as the Vancouver International Burlesque Festival and the Miss Exotic World Pageant are held. In 2008, The New York Times noted that burlesque had made a comeback in the city’s art performance scene.



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