Pole Fitness is the Ultimate Core and Upper Body Workout for the Modern Woman

Posts tagged ‘rhode island’

We had a Great End of Session Winter Cabaret

Everyone did a great job at The End of Session. We had an unbelievable group of performers and a great audience!!!

The ladies worked hard and it payed off. All of our performers spent the past 6 weeks preparing for this and it turned out excellent.

This show featured Chair Dancing, Pole Dancing, and

Solo’s by Jennifer, Kerri, Alaina, and Briana. For more pictures from the show click here.

Click here to watch Pink Pastie Burlesque Video

On July 24th, 2011 JMK Entertainment hosted their first annual Pink Pastie Burlesque Show at Roots Cafe located in Downtown Providence. We raised over $1,000 for Susan G. Komen for the Cure. Thank you to everyone who participated in this event!!

Hot 106.3 Deanna Cruz taking Pole & Zumba at JMK

After taking pole for the first time, Deanna Cruz wrote…

Pole Dancing May Just be my New Workout!
When all else fails why not try some Pole Dancing??  And that’s exactly what I did yesterday as I stopped in at JM Kennedy Studios in Pawtucket for a Pole Dancing AND Zumba class.  Let me begin by saying I love working out.  Yes you heard me I actually like it.  I also love running, but I’ve been laying off it a bit because of my lower back.  I decided it’s time to find something else to do instead of just running.  So I turned to the experts, Jennifer Kennedy from JM Kennedy Entertainment.  And let me just say if Pole Dancing can get me Jennifer’s body than DAMN I’m IN!  Lol.  I will admit I was a little intimidate and maybe even scared for my life.  I mean how the hell am I supposed to climb up this pole or even hang there.  But throughout the whole class I kept telling myself, “Just Have Fun” and that’s exactly what I did.  And what a workout!  I forgot that there are other things you can do instead of running to get a good workout.  Pole Dancing is a GREAT upper body AND core workout.  So does that mean I’ll finally have a 6-pack??  Well maybe not in the next few classes but maybe I’ll become a ‘Pollerina’ afterall.  So after an hour of Pole Dancing I stayed for Zumba.  My first Zumba class may I add and wow I felt like I was at a club.  I mean this is a workout right?  Zumba made me realize you can have fun while burnig some calories.  Geezzz I need to change up my workout routine more often and have fun with it.  I had a really good time and almost forgot I was working out.  Thanks ladies….you’ll definitely be seeing me again.  Check out the video below.  ENJOY!

Deanna Cruz, “Pole Dancing May Just Be my New Workout!“, August 3, 2011

Click Here to Register for Classes

Click Here to view JM Kennedy Dance & Pole Fitness Studio Website

We raised over $1,000!!!!

Thank you to everyone who attended and participated in our first annual Pink Pastie Burlesque Show. We raised over $1,000 for Susan G. Komen for the Cure!!! A Special Thank you to Catz Exotic Wear for donating a pair of pink heals that sold for $500.

More Picture’s and Video from this event coming soon

ACADEMY OF BURLESQUE W/ JENNIFER KENNEDY

Unleash your inner diva!!!

WELCOME TO JMKENNEDY ACADEMY SCHOOL OF BURLESQUE

I am thrilled to announce a brand new lass series, so Ladies come out to play because we have a great summer class curriculem for you to choose.  Click here to register online.

Our brand new class series is dedicated to the Art of Burlesque.

JMKennedyEntertainment  will transform any wannna-be burlesque diva into a great performer. Join the JMK Showgirl Chorus and

you will learn and have the chance to perform several fun and sexy burlesque chorus acts at the JMK Recital Show.  So get  your favorite lingerie

out of hiding in the top drawer and let’s get a jump on for summer… with Burlesquercise!

Learn the Art-Of :

Walking in Heels

Pastie Making

The Art of Tease

Taste of Tease

Bump & Grind

Burlesque Makeup

Tassel Twirling

Take it of for you Lover

Burlesque with Props

Fan Dancing

How to Make your Fans

Glove Peeling

How to Take off your Stockings

Work your Feather Boa

Costuming

AND MUCH MOORE!!!

Space is limited, and this is the only JMKBurlesque Showgirl Chorus series I will be offering until August, so come and get it while the gettin’s good!

No nudity is required.  This is all about comfort level. So, come on girls lets educate our audience. And give em the Wow! factor.

Wednesday 6:30pm – 7:30pm

Click Here to register for this class.

Mother’s Day Tea Hat Kentucky Derby Party!!!!

Tickets are On Sale Now

Combine the excitement of thoroughbred racing Champagne and fantastic food to create an extraordinary Mothers Day experience.  This event includes admission to Plainridge Racecourse, a shared buffet and four hour use of a shared suite plus a fabulous day of watching the Kentucky Day Races (simulcast). Tickets are $20.

Buffet

Costume Contest

PRIZES For

Best Most Creative  Hat –  Best Dressed  –  Celebrity Look like

Raffle Tickets for Sale

$10,000 Kentucky Derby Charity Give-Away

*Madd is our Charity of Choice

Click here to learn more about this event.

MENU

Hot Hors Dʼoeuvres

Chicken Tenders served with Honey Mustard Sauce.

Scallops wrapped in Bacon.

Stuffed Mushroom Caps.

Cocktail Meatballs Marinara.

Mozzarella Sticks Marinara.

Spanakopita.

Cocktail Franks en croute served with Spicy Mustard.

Mini Deep Dish Pizza.

Cocktail Spring Rolls served with Duck Sauce.



Now offering Zumba Toning!!!!

  1. Register now for Zumba Toning!!!

    Zumba® ToningZumba® Toning Classes – When it comes to body sculpting, the Zumba Toning program raises the bar (or rather, the toning stick). It combines targeted body-sculpting exercises and high-energy cardio work with Latin-infused Zumba® moves to create a calorie-torching, strength-training dance fitness-party. Students learn how to use lightweight, maraca-like Toning Sticks to enhance rhythm and tone all their target zones, including arms, abs, glutes and thighs. The Zumba Toning class is the perfect way for enthusiasts to sculpt their bodies naturally while having a total blast.

    Visit our Website:

    http://www.jmkennedyentertainment.com/Site/Home.html

     

Post Pregnancy Workout for the Modern Women!

Being a Pole Fitness Mom, Before and After!

Kerri's before and After Picture

I am the first at the JM Kennedy Dance & Pole Fitness Studio to have what we like to joke about as a “Pole Baby”.  Yes, taking Pole Fitness classes made me feel sexier and then before I knew it… “Oops!”…here’s my pole baby.  I had my son in July and in September I was back in the studio taking classes.  By October I was ready to perform in front of an audience for our annual Halloween Show and by January I was teaching Pole Fitness classes for the first time.

For the ladies out there that may currently be pregnant, I do not recommend pole fitness as a source of exercise.  With the pregnancy, it limits the number of safe moves you can perform and it’s just not worth the risk.  There are many types of safe exercises you can perform while pregnant like walking, swimming and yoga. I also recommend using coco butter daily to avoid stretch marks.

I also recommend that you wait at least 12 weeks after having the baby before taking pole fitness classes.  It does take time to gain the strength back and get your muscles back into shape after giving birth.  Even the students out there that haven’t had a baby know,  if you miss a few months or even weeks of pole you’re not going to be as strong as before. Don’t get discouraged, your muscle memory will come back. I am living proof of that.

If you’re looking for a way to get back into shape and be the sexy mama you know you are, pole fitness is the way to go!

Kerri, Jennifer, and Matt at his 1st Birthday

This article was inspired by Jennifer Kennedy owner of JM Kennedy Dance and Pole Fitness studio and Mother of two.

Guess What? No Dance Background Required!

The Hinge

No Dance Background Required!!!

Guess What?! No Dance Background Required!

Hello to all the Sexy Ladies out there!  Yeah, I’m talking to you!  My name is Kerri.  I’ve been a Pole Fitness Instructor with the JM Kennedy Dance Studio since January of 2010.  I am certified through NETA.

So you’d like to know how I became part of this amazing studio?  Well, here it is!

It all started in February of 2007.  I’d always wanted to take some sort of dance class, maybe hip hop or jazz but I was 27 at the time….where would I begin?  I was driving home from work one day and heard an advertisement on the radio about Pole Fitness classes.  That would be perfect!  I made a mental note to call as soon as I got home.   I got the class schedule and came to the next walk-in class available.  Now, mind you, I had no sort of dance training or taken a dance class before in my life!   I walked into the 3rd week of the session surrounded by other students that seemed like professionals to me (Airplane…what’s an airplane?).  I couldn’t find my right from my left.  I’m not going to lie…it intimidated me.  But I hung in there and after a few classes I started feeling comfortable and couldn’t get enough of it.  After 6 classes there was a noticeable difference in my appearance.  I started getting comments such as “where’d you get those muscles?”  And we can’t forget the infamous bruising…”how’d you get those bruises”.  (I’ve learned that everyone has their own way of answering those questions).

After taking a few sessions at the studio, I got to know Jen and I started helping her out in the office.   Jen is a motivator and the saying, Never Say Never, definitely applies to her classes.  Elevator, I could never do an elevator…by the 6th week I’d guess about 90% of the students are doing elevators.  She also motivated me to start teaching my own Pole Fitness classes.  Did I ever think in my wildest dreams I would be a Pole Fitness Instructor one day? No way!  But here I am, teaching not only Basic Pole for Beginners but Jen also allowed me to create a Pole Level I class for the women out there not ready for Pole II. 

A little bit more about me….I am a proud mom to a 19-month old boy.  During the day I work as a secretary in Downtown Providence.  I am also part of JM Kennedy’s Fringe Dancers who have performed at various venues.  The Fringe Dancers specialize in Cabaret and Burlesque performances.  We most recently performed at the Hi-Hat in Davol Square for a Valentine’s Burlesque Show which included singing, pole dancing, chair dancing and belly dancing. 

So, take it from someone with no dance background.  This is the place to start!  It’s never too late.  I’ve seen all sizes and ages take class at the JM Kennedy Dance Studio.  I’ve seen mothers, daughters, grandmothers, sisters, friends, co-workers and even the occasional being of the male species.  We do not discriminate at the JM Kennedy Dance Studio!

http://www.jmkennedyentertainment.com/Site/Home.html

Register Now for Belly Dance – Check the Schedule for Upcoming Class Dates and Times

Belly dancing with a sword makes you feel powerful.

Click the link below to register for our Next 6 week Session of Belly Dance:

http://clients.mindbodyonline.com/ws.asp?studioid=10118&stype=-101&sTG=23&sVT=11&sView=week

According to Wikipedia:

Origins and early history of Belly Dance

 

Artistic depiction of belly dancing

Belly dancing arose from various dancing styles which were performed in the Middle East and North Africa. One theory is that belly dance may have roots in the ancient Arab tribal religions as a dance to the goddess of fertility . A third theory is that belly dance was always danced as entertainment, some believe that the movements of dancing girls depicted in carvings from Pharaonic times are typical of belly dancing.[1] As the term belly dance has come to refer to a wide variety of dance practices, predominantly performed by independent female dancers, it is very difficult for any single claim to be upheld.

Another theory is that belly dance was originally danced by women for women in the Levant, and North Africa. The book “Dancer of Shamahka” is widely cited; it is a romanticizedmemoir written by a modern author, Armen Ohanian, published in 1918. In Middle Eastern society two specific belly dance movements have been used in childbirth for generations.[2]

Because belly dance derives from individual performance, it has a diverse history of origin, and continues to evolve to this day. Some[who?] suggest that belly dance shares origins from migrating peoples from all around the borders of the Mediterranean, resulting in the similarities that can be seen between ‘belly dance’ as found in North Africa and Middle East.

Belly dance was popularized in the West during the Romantic movement of the 18th and 19th centuries, when Orientalist artists depicted romanticized images of harem life in theOttoman Empire. Around this time, dancers from Middle Eastern countries began to perform at various World’s Fairs, often drawing crowds in numbers that rivaled those for the science and technology exhibits. It was during this period that the term “oriental” or “eastern” dancing is first used. Several dancers, including the French author Colette, engaged in “oriental” dancing, sometimes passing off their own interpretations as authentic. Also the pseudo-Javanese dancer Mata Hari, convicted in 1917 by the French for being a German spy, danced in a style similar to what is known as belly dance.

Egyptian forms of belly dance, alongside the development of Egyptian music, were heavily influenced by the presence of European colonial forces, and increasing urbanisation in Egypt. This resulted in variations in the dance brought in by influences as diverse as marching bands, and visits of the Russian ballet. Many of the aspects recognisable as belly dance today in fact derive from these cross-cultural hybrids.

Any or all of these factors may have contributed to the development of belly dance as we know it today.[3]

Costume

In the West, the costume most associated with belly dance is the bedlah (Arabic for “suit”). It owes its creation to the Victorian painters of “Orientalism” and the harem fantasy productions of vaudevilleburlesque, andHollywood during the turn of the last century, rather than to authentic Middle Eastern dress.

The bedlah style includes a fitted top or bra (usually with a fringe of beads or coins), a fitted hip belt (again with a fringe of beads or coins), and a skirt or harem pants. The bra and belt may be richly decorated with beads, sequins, braid and embroidery. The belt may be a separate piece, or sewn into a skirt.

Badia Masabni, a Cairo cabaret owner, is credited with bringing the costume to Egypt, because it was the image that Western tourists wanted.

The hip belt is a broad piece of fabric worn low on the hips. It may have straight edge, or may be curved or angled. The bra usually matches the belt and does not resemble lingerie. The classic harem pants are full and gathered at the ankle, but there are many variations. Sometimes pants and a sheer skirt are worn together. Skirts may be flowing creations made of multiple layers of one color sheer fabric chiffon.

Costume in America

Oriental-style American dancers often purchase their costumes from Egypt or Turkey, but hallmarks of the classical “American” style include a headband with fringe, sheer harem pants or skirt rather than tight lycra, and the use of coins and metalwork to decorate the bra.

For the folkloric and baladi dances, a full-length beledi dress or galabeyah is worn, with or without cutouts.

American Tribal style dancers often make their own costumes or arrange to have them custom-made, as personality and originality are an important part of the costuming. This style of costume tends to involve large pants covered with one or more skirts and belts. The top is usually a coin bra with pieces hanging from it, and dancers wear flowers, headbands, metal headdresses, and other folkoric-inspired pieces in their hair. They also often wear bindis and sport large tattoos that travel around the hip and belly area.

Belly dance props

Props are used, especially in American restaurant style, to spark audience interest and add variety to the performance, although some traditionalists frown on their use. Some props in common usage are:

  • Finger cymbals (zills or sagats)
  • Cane (in the Saiidi)
  • Veil
  • Sword
  • Candelabra headdress (shamadan)
  • Veil poi (mostly in Tribal belly dance)
  • Fire sticks (mostly in Tribal)
  • Tambourine
  • Fan (mostly in Tribal)
  • Snakes (usually either pythons or boa constrictors)
  • Fanveils

Steps and technique

Most of the movements in belly dancing involve isolating different parts of the body (hips, shoulders, chest, stomach etc.), which appear similar to the isolations used in jazz ballet, but are often driven differently. In much of bellydance there is a focus upon the core muscles of the body producing the movement rather than the external muscles of the body. Egyptian and Lebanese bellydance in particular emphasise the need for movemements to originate in the muscles of the back. Correct posture is as important in bellydance as it is in other fields of dance. In most belly dance styles, the focus is on the hip and pelvic area. Due to the diversity of styles and ‘origins’ of the dance, many of the moves are referred to by a wide variety of different terminologies. However, from an observer’s point of view bellydance includes certain key elements.

Important moves are:

  • Shiver or Shimmy – a shimmering vibration of the hips. This vibration is usually layered onto other movements to create depth in performance. It may be created by moving the knees past each other at high speed, although some dancers use contractions of the glutes or thighs instead. It is also possible to perform this using the muscles of the lower back. The two terms may refer to performing this move in different directions, as it is possible to create this vibration moving the hips alternately up and down, side-to-side, or in a forward and back swinging motion. The same move can be performed using the shoulders and is sometimes called a shoulder shimmy.
  • Hip hits – A staccato movement of the hips out from the body. This can also be performed using other body parts such as the shoulders or chest. The move is usually performed by a quick shifting of the weight from one leg to the other and creates the impression of a swinging pelvis.
  • Undulations – Fluid movements of the hips or of the chest in a circular or rotating fashion. There are a wide variety of movements of this kind, of which the most well known is probably the rotating movements of the chest forward, up, back and down to create the impression of riding a camel.

Different styles also incorporate kicks and arm movements as an integral part of the style.

Health and belly dancing

Belly dance is a non-impact, weight-bearing exercise and is thus suitable for all ages, and is a good exercise for the prevention of osteoporosis in older people. Many of the moves involve isolations, which improves flexibility of the torso. Dancing with the veil can help build strength in the upper-body, arm and shoulders. Playing the zills trains fingers to work independently and builds strength. The legs and long muscles of the back are strengthened by hip movements.[14]

Paffrath also researched the effect of belly dance on women with menstruation problems. The subjects reported a more positive approach toward their menstruation, sexuality, and bodies.

Article Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belly_dance

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